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How Oxytocin Helps Make You Feel Better

This site is written to explain the what, why and where of oxytocin in a no-nonsense fashion. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition mentioned or not mentioned here. You are encouraged to print of this information and take it to your physician as a useful educational tool for working with oxytocin from a medical perspective.

Oxytocin is a naturally occurring hormone in the brain. It is released through very simple acts such as receiving a hug, being listened to, laughter, touch, orgasm, chocolate, good food, and good music to name a few. However, for adults and children who have experienced trauma at early ages, or who’ve been exposed to prolonged states of stress, the brain’s natural oxytocin response can be remarkably diminished, leading to severe behavior challenges, attachment issues, depression, anxiety, panic attacks and more.

Much of the literature and findings regarding oxytocin has been written by scientists for scientist. Many are sponsored by universities and pharmaceutical companies. They may be difficult to understand and decipher or even worse, leave average readers feeling more confused than before they started reading. It is important that a hormone with the potential of oxytocin be communicated and understood in a manner that makes sense and has real-life application.

This site is written to explain the what, why and where of oxytocin in a no-nonsense fashion. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition mentioned or not mentioned here. You are encouraged to print of this information and take it to your physician as a useful educational tool for working with oxytocin from a medical perspective.

Oxytocin is a naturally occurring hormone in the brain. It is released through very simple acts such as receiving a hug, being listened to, laughter, touch, orgasm, chocolate, good food, and good music to name a few. However, for adults and children who have experienced trauma at early ages, or who’ve been exposed to prolonged states of stress, the brain’s natural oxytocin response can be remarkably diminished, leading to severe behavior challenges, attachment issues, depression, anxiety, panic attacks and more.

Much of the literature and findings regarding oxytocin has been written by scientists for scientist. Many are sponsored by universities and pharmaceutical companies. They may be difficult to understand and decipher or even worse, leave average readers feeling more confused than before they started reading. It is important that a hormone with the potential of oxytocin be communicated and understood in a manner that makes sense and has real-life application.

Why am I qualified to provide this information?

 I’ve been studying oxytocin intensively for the past three years. I believe my background of clinical practice, research and theory can be most useful to you. I have studied the effects of trauma and stress on the neurology of the brain and body for over ten years. During that time, I have pioneered a therapy and parenting approach that maximizes the activity of oxytocin without realizing I was doing that.  My approach has proven effective in helping adults and children throughout the world recover from traumatic experiences.  I’ve helped adults and children recover from depression and anxiety. Parents raising children who’ve experienced early trauma and neglect have benefited from my parenting approach. I have also effectively treated clients diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder, bipolar, depression, attention deficit disorder, autism and oppositional defiant disorder.  As a clinician I have received worldwide recognition. The Post Institute Network includes almost 20,000 members of parents and professionals who closely follow my parenting and therapy model.

I have written and co-written nine books and authored over twenty-five DVD and audio CD programs. You can learn more about this work at www.postinstitute.com. My involvement in this work helped me recognize the far-reaching implications of oxytocin, not only in clinical work and the POST parenting model, but in all adult and child interactions.  I quickly realized that information about oxytocin’s valuable benefits must be shared.

I am fascinated with oxytocin and excited about its potential for increased well-being in society, especially for people who’ve tried a wide array of psychotropic medications with little gain or have experienced painful and life-altering side effects.
If something will work for the most challenging population, doesn’t it make sense that it will work for less challenging, or perhaps other challenging issues? The answer is yes! Oxytocin is already proving effective for treating autism and schizophrenia. In trial research which I am supporting, it is proving to be tremendously effective for both adults and children who have otherwise not responded to years of previous medication use for a variety of behavioral and emotional disorders. This hormone is very important. I hope this report offers clear information about oxytocin so you realize its possibilities and benefit from this knowledge.

For an in depth explanation of oxytocin for adults and relationships, read The Chemistry of Connection by Susan Kuchinskas. To understand how to apply the tools to releasing oxytocin in parenting children with severe behavior challenges, read my book From Fear to Love or The Great Behavior Breakdown, available at www.postinstitute.com